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Great Lakes BioMimicry

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Great Lakes BioMimicry


Biomimicry is the practice of learning from nature and emulating its forms, processes and systems?to solve human problems and drive innovation. People started doing this a long time ago: Leonardo da Vinci observed nature, which was reflected in his design drawings, and the Wright brothers studied bird wings to create flight.

Throughout the world and across industries, people are drawing from nature's genius once again. A product inspired by sharkskin actually repels bacteria by design, not chemicals ? perfect for use in medical settings. Japan's bullet train was redesigned thanks to a birdwatcher and engineer who was inspired by the kingfisher's seamless entry into water and the owl's near silent flight. (The train is now quieter, 10% faster and uses 15% less electricity.) Velcro was inspired by burdock burrs, which easily stick to your clothes through a hook-and-loop design.

Biomimicry offers a pathway to sustainabilty. By mimicking nature, we can create?life-friendly products, buildings and cities. Teams can work together more intelligently when operating as a living system. When we closely align to nature's principles, our world can flourish.

When it comes to innovation, nature?offers 3.8 billion years worth of insights and clever adaptations. Adding biomimicry into an innovation toolobox can help businesses solve a problem?or create a disruptive technology.??

                                                         
  
  
  
Great Lakes BioMimicry


Biomimicry is the practice of learning from nature and emulating its forms, processes and systems?to solve human problems and drive innovation. People started doing this a long time ago: Leonardo da Vinci observed nature, which was reflected in his design drawings, and the Wright brothers studied bird wings to create flight.

Throughout the world and across industries, people are drawing from nature's genius once again. A product inspired by sharkskin actually repels bacteria by design, not chemicals ? perfect for use in medical settings. Japan's bullet train was redesigned thanks to a birdwatcher and engineer who was inspired by the kingfisher's seamless entry into water and the owl's near silent flight. (The train is now quieter, 10% faster and uses 15% less electricity.) Velcro was inspired by burdock burrs, which easily stick to your clothes through a hook-and-loop design.

Biomimicry offers a pathway to sustainabilty. By mimicking nature, we can create?life-friendly products, buildings and cities. Teams can work together more intelligently when operating as a living system. When we closely align to nature's principles, our world can flourish.

When it comes to innovation, nature?offers 3.8 billion years worth of insights and clever adaptations. Adding biomimicry into an innovation toolobox can help businesses solve a problem?or create a disruptive technology.??

                                                         
  
  
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